Browse Items (47 total)

  • Tags: local food system

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Tobias Knight, a visitor to Plenitud PR during a service learning exchange with St. Thomas University’s VISIONS program. This is the first time Tobias saw or tried eating a starfruit.

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Plenitud PR is an organic farm based on permaculture principles and techniques. Through a variety of growing and sustainability practices, including creating a food forest, rainwater harvesting, greenhouse production, terraced farming, raised beds,…

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When looking out over the food forest on Plenitud’s mountainside, you can see across to the tents at the campsite above the food forest.

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Starfruit ready to harvest just three months after Hurricane María devastated the island of Puerto Rico. The renewal and resiliency of nature is amazing.

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Pathway through two mountainside terraced garden beds. The terraced beds are planted on counter and designed to help control the flow and absorption of water from rainfall. Because of the terraforming and water management techniques that Plenitud…

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Saving cilantro seeds from plants that matured in the greenhouse. Seeds saved will be planted and shared.

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Service learning program participant Sunita Dharod from St. Thomas University’s VISIONS program weeding the garden beds in the greenhouse at Plenitud.

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Service learning program participants Darian Kolb, Sunita Dharod and Mackenna Crisally from St. Thomas University’s VISIONS program gaining hands on experience by volunteering in the garden as they learn about permaculture and agroecology…

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While working in the greenhouse at Plenitud, resident Rebekah Sánchez and intern Bri Treppeda take a moment to show their friendship and affection.

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Rebekah Sánchez, a resident and team member at Plenitud PR, harvesting purslane from the greenhouse garden bed. Purslane is often thought to be a weed, but when allowed to grow and harvested for food, it is an extremely nutritious and delicious…

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Christina Proxenos, a volunteer with Raíces Cultural Center who came on our January 2018 relief support trip to Puerto Rico, harvesting purslane from the Plenitud PR greenhouse to include in the day’s lunch salad.

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Service learning program participant Duncan Anderson from St. Thomas University’s VISIONS program watering seedlings in the greenhouse at Plenitud.

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Some herbs, greens and flowers are allowed to go to flower and seed to help attract and feed the pollinators as well as for seed saving for future plantings. Cilantro flowers are great at attracting pollinators, especially honeybees and native bees.

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Plenitud PR resident and team member Rebekah Sánchez checking the progress of seedling starts in the greenhouse at Plenitud. Seedlings are grown under the plastic roof of the greenhouse to control the amount of water they receive and protect them…

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Service learning program participants Sunita Dharod and Darian Kolb from St. Thomas University’s VISIONS program weeding the garden beds in the greenhouse at Plenitud.

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Service learning program participant Mackenna Crisally from St. Thomas University’s VISIONS program watering the greens growing in the greenhouse beds at Plenitud.

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The garden beds at Plenitud PR are filled with life and biodiversity, which in turn helps with natural pest control. Lizards hang out on the edge of the garden beds to sun themselves and wait for insects.

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Many hands make light work. With about a dozen service learning volunteers, the entire greenhouse can be weeded and watered in about 15 minutes.

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Service learning program participant Mackenna Crisally from St. Thomas University’s VISIONS program watering the greens growing in the greenhouse beds at Plenitud.

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The greenhouse at Plenitud PR is used for food production and educational programs. Greens are more easily grown in the controlled environment under the greenhouse plastic, where the amount of water the plants receive can be monitored and controlled.…

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All visitors to Plenitud contribute to the work on the farm or in the community in some way. Service learning program participant from St. Thomas University’s VISIONS program watering plants in the greenhouse at Plenitud.

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Service learning program participant Mary Timm from St. Thomas University’s VISIONS program watering plants in the greenhouse at Plenitud.

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St. Thomas University VISIONS program participant Tobias Knight participating in service learning at Plenitud PR’s permaculture farm.

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The Plenitud PR team designed and terraformed along the slopes at their farm in Las Marías. Farming using permaculture principles has helped hold the soil, and the farm saw little erosion during Hurricane María and the months of rain after the…

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Bri Treppeda was an intern at Plenitud PR when Raíces visited the farm in January 2018. Here she is harvesting patchouli to use as mulch.
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