Browse Items (84 total)

  • Tags: agroecology

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Seed brigade volunteers sorting seed for distribution by the PR Resilience Fund. Bulk donations had to be separated into individual seed packets for distribution. The help of dozens of volunteers every day for a week made it possible to ge the seeds…

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Art packs from Hudson Valley Seed Company donations were set aside specifically for schools. The art packs would allow those teaching agriculture to integrate the arts into their activities and lessons. This is essential because art and music classes…

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Sorting seeds sent by Hudson Valley Seed Company for Semitecas, or mini seed banks. These mini seed banks are designated for schools. Due to a lack of funding, schools in Puerto Rico no longer offer music and art so Hudson Valley Seed Library seed…

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Some of the seed donations that came to the PR Resilience Fund were in bulk packages and had to be sorted, separated into smaller envelopes and labeled. Volunteers from all over the world worked for five days to get the seeds sorted and ready for…

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Volunteer and San Juan resident Rahnawn Littles sorting a set of seeds from Hudson Valley Seed Library for donation to school gardens, organic farms and agroecology projects, community gardens, and home growers throughout the island of Puerto Rico.

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Tobias Knight, a visitor to Plenitud PR during a service learning exchange with St. Thomas University’s VISIONS program. This is the first time Tobias saw or tried eating a starfruit.

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Plenitud PR is an organic farm based on permaculture principles and techniques. Through a variety of growing and sustainability practices, including creating a food forest, rainwater harvesting, greenhouse production, terraced farming, raised beds,…

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When looking out over the food forest on Plenitud’s mountainside, you can see across to the tents at the campsite above the food forest.

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Starfruit ready to harvest just three months after Hurricane María devastated the island of Puerto Rico. The renewal and resiliency of nature is amazing.

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Pathway through two mountainside terraced garden beds. The terraced beds are planted on counter and designed to help control the flow and absorption of water from rainfall. Because of the terraforming and water management techniques that Plenitud…

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Saving cilantro seeds from plants that matured in the greenhouse. Seeds saved will be planted and shared.

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Service learning program participant Sunita Dharod from St. Thomas University’s VISIONS program weeding the garden beds in the greenhouse at Plenitud.

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Service learning program participants Darian Kolb, Sunita Dharod and Mackenna Crisally from St. Thomas University’s VISIONS program gaining hands on experience by volunteering in the garden as they learn about permaculture and agroecology…

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Permaculture planting principles promote biodiversity of plants and animals in order to nourish and support the regeneration and building of the soil instead of the depletion and erosion of soil that happens in monocropped, industrial agriculture…

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While working in the greenhouse at Plenitud, resident Rebekah Sánchez and intern Bri Treppeda take a moment to show their friendship and affection.

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Rebekah Sánchez, a resident and team member at Plenitud PR, harvesting purslane from the greenhouse garden bed. Purslane is often thought to be a weed, but when allowed to grow and harvested for food, it is an extremely nutritious and delicious…

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Christina Proxenos, a volunteer with Raíces Cultural Center who came on our January 2018 relief support trip to Puerto Rico, harvesting purslane from the Plenitud PR greenhouse to include in the day’s lunch salad.

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Service learning program participant Duncan Anderson from St. Thomas University’s VISIONS program watering seedlings in the greenhouse at Plenitud.

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Some herbs, greens and flowers are allowed to go to flower and seed to help attract and feed the pollinators as well as for seed saving for future plantings. Cilantro flowers are great at attracting pollinators, especially honeybees and native bees.

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Plenitud PR resident and team member Rebekah Sánchez checking the progress of seedling starts in the greenhouse at Plenitud. Seedlings are grown under the plastic roof of the greenhouse to control the amount of water they receive and protect them…

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Service learning program participants Sunita Dharod and Darian Kolb from St. Thomas University’s VISIONS program weeding the garden beds in the greenhouse at Plenitud.
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