Browse Items (87 total)

  • Tags: Las Marías

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Raíces director Francisco G. Gómez, program coordinator Nicole Wines and volunteer Christina Proxenos with Plenitud PR resident and crew member Carson Ingley.

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Raíces director Francisco G. Gómez, program coordinator Nicole Wines and volunteer Christina Proxenos with the VISIONS group and some of the Plenitud PR crew during our visit in January 2018.

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The river that runs along Plenitud PR’s compound.

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After a morning filled with educational tours and presentations, as well as volunteer work on the farm, groups of service learning volunteers head down to the river to cool off.

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A tent set up in the camping section of Plenitud PR’s compound. Tents are protected from the rain by a canopy and a drainage ditch dug around each camp site.

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Stopping to smell the flowers on a tour of the permaculture gardens of Plenitud PR’s farm.

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A flower in the ginger family in bloom at the top of a 10’+ stalk.

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A flower in the ginger family in bloom in the permaculture gardens at Plenitud PR in Las Marías, Puerto Rico.

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Tobias Knight, a visitor to Plenitud PR during a service learning exchange with St. Thomas University’s VISIONS program. This is the first time Tobias saw or tried eating a starfruit.

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A variety of bamboo cultivated by Plenitud specifically to help stabilize the soil with its deep root systems as well as help control and absorb runoff during storms.

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Plenitud PR is an organic farm based on permaculture principles and techniques. Through a variety of growing and sustainability practices, including creating a food forest, rainwater harvesting, greenhouse production, terraced farming, raised beds,…

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A hand built gazebo with hammocks for resting in between working, learning and sharing.

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When looking out over the food forest on Plenitud’s mountainside, you can see across to the tents at the campsite above the food forest.

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Flower in bloom in Plenitud PR’s permaculture gardens.

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Starfruit ready to harvest just three months after Hurricane María devastated the island of Puerto Rico. The renewal and resiliency of nature is amazing.

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Pathway through two mountainside terraced garden beds. The terraced beds are planted on counter and designed to help control the flow and absorption of water from rainfall. Because of the terraforming and water management techniques that Plenitud…

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View of the river that runs along the Plenitud home base.

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Earthbag house at Plenitud PR. This resilient structure made it through Hurricane María and the months of rain that followed with no damage.

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The first earthbag house built at Plenitud Puerto Rico. The structure made it through Hurricane María and the months of rain that followed with no damage.

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View of the developing food forest at Plenitud PR that can be seen from the front door of the farm’s earthbag house.

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Back of the first earthbag and superadobe house built at Plenitud, designed by Owen Ingley. This home did not use the dome structure that is often used in earthbag building, but was instead designed with a more conventional zinc roof. This structure…

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Built over 5 years ago, this superadobe doghouse was the first earthbag and superadobe structure built at Plenitud PR as a pilot and test project.

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Saving cilantro seeds from plants that matured in the greenhouse. Seeds saved will be planted and shared.

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Service learning program participant Sunita Dharod from St. Thomas University’s VISIONS program weeding the garden beds in the greenhouse at Plenitud.
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